Nick Knowles Addresses THAT Conflict From DIY SOS And Confirms It’s ‘Now Resolved’

Nick Knowles, 59, has finally spoken out about his absence from DIY SOS following a clash with the BBC over a grain campaign.

The host was removed from the show’s special after appearing in an ad for Shreddies, in violation of the broadcaster’s guidelines.

Nick spoke about the situation during an appearance on This Morning on Friday, describing the absence as a “misunderstanding”, before assuring it is “solved now”.

Tackling it: Nick Knowles tackled DIY SOS’s ax conflict, confirming it’s ‘now resolved’

When questioned by Alison Hammond and Dermot O’Leary during the daytime show, Nick replied, “It was a little odd, but I knew it was just for the one show.

“It was actually a misunderstanding – we all figured it out – but it meant I couldn’t do that one show.

“When he gave his deputy, Rhod Gilbert, the seal of approval, Nick continued, ‘But then Rhod came in and Rhod is such a nice guy and he got emotionally involved in the whole story so I thought he did a great job.’

Inconvenient: The host was removed from a show's special after starring in an ad for the Shreddies, in violation of broadcaster guidelines (pictured on DIY SOS)

Inconvenient: The host was removed from a show’s special after starring in an ad for the Shreddies, in violation of broadcaster guidelines (pictured on DIY SOS)

Clean up: Nick spoke about the situation during a performance on This Morning on Friday, describing the absence as a 'misunderstanding', before assuring it's 'now resolved'

Clean up: Nick spoke about the situation during a performance on This Morning on Friday, describing the absence as a ‘misunderstanding’, before assuring it’s ‘now resolved’

Nick quickly got off topic as he went on to explain what filming was like during Covid-19.

The ax came on the show after 23 years, as Nick missed the Children in Need special from DIY SOS.

Despite dismissing the absence as a “misunderstanding”, the presenter has previously admitted that he “regrets” doing the ad campaign.

Back on screens: Nick played a track builder in the ad - a move that went against the BBC ban on TV talent swapping their on-screen personas

Back on screens: Nick played a track builder in the ad – a move that went against the BBC ban on TV talent swapping their on-screen personas

One show: 'It was actually a misunderstanding - we all sorted it out - but it meant I couldn't do that one show,' he explained

One show: ‘It was actually a misunderstanding – we all sorted it out – but it meant I couldn’t do that one show,’ he explained

Nick played a track-builder in the ad – a move that went against the BBC’s ban on TV talent trading their on-screen personas.

He told The Sun of his decision to star in the ad: “You know, you have to earn and there was a period during the pandemic where shows just weren’t made. That job wasn’t there and I have to take care of my family and an opportunity arose.

‘What I think is a shame, of course, is the confusion that has arisen around it. I certainly wouldn’t have chosen to upset the BBC or disrupt the program in any way.’

Rules: Speaking about the incident, Nick admitted he regrets the “confusion” he caused with the ad, but took the job to make money during the pandemic (pictured on DIY SOS)

BBC policy that Nick Knowles was suspected of violating

References to BBC content in advertisements

15.3.40: Advertisements or promotions involving talent must not imitate BBC content, reference or relate to or ‘pass through’, for example by replicating editorial elements of a programme, such as characters, logos, titles, channel names or music or images associated with the program, or by using or directly imitating sets or key locations, catchphrases, or formatting points from the content.

Advertisements should not mimic or “pass on” the talent’s role in the program. No more than one BBC talent from the same program may be used in advertisements for any non-BBC related product. Multiple members of talent from different BBC programs are unlikely to appear in the same advertisement.

The ad must not discredit the BBC.

Nick added that DIY SOS “is more important than just a job to me. I live and breathe it and have done it for 23 years. It’s really very important to me. “I’m just glad we all got to sit down and work our way through it.”

The BBC star confirmed in May 2021 that he would not be fired from DIY SOS over the ad that saw the company reverse their stance.

Nick told The Sun: “I’ve always said DIY SOS is more than just a presentation job to me, it’s part of me.

“It’s in my heart and working for the BBC for over 22 years is something I’ve never taken for granted.

“I will continue filming new episodes of DIY SOS in the coming months and will be on your screens again next year wearing the purple shirts.”

Fans of the presenter, who once made as much as £300,000 in a year from his BBC work, took to social media at the time to defend the star.

Popular: Knowles has been organizing DIY SOS since 1999.  The show, which is produced by the BBC, sees a team of builders and volunteers transform a person's home (Nick pictured with the DIY SOS team in 2008)

Popular: Knowles has been organizing DIY SOS since 1999. The show, which is produced by the BBC, sees a team of builders and volunteers transform a person’s home (Nick pictured with the DIY SOS team in 2008)

Some even labeled the BBC “inconsistent” for getting on Knowles, while Gary Lineker, host of Match of the Day, continued to advertise Walkers chips.

One Twitter user said: ‘This is ridiculous. What is the difference between Gary Lineker selling Walkers Crisps? Very inconsistent policy?’

“I will continue filming new episodes of DIY SOS in the coming months and will be on your screens again next year wearing the purple shirts.”

Fans of the presenter, who once made as much as £300,000 in a year from his BBC work, took to social media at the time to defend the star.

Some even labeled the BBC “inconsistent” for getting on Knowles, while Gary Lineker, host of Match of the Day, continued to advertise Walkers chips.

One Twitter user said: ‘This is ridiculous. What is the difference between Gary Lineker selling Walkers Crisps? Very inconsistent policy?’

Shreddies have not revealed how much Knowles paid for the ad, but an expert told MailOnline it could be in the region of £200,000.

Trouble: Nick played a track builder in the ad - a move that went against the BBC's ban on TV talent swapping their on-screen personas

Trouble: Nick played a track builder in the ad – a move that went against the BBC’s ban on TV talent swapping their on-screen personas

In the ad, Nick plays a builder who pours a bowl of cornflakes into his hat, while calling himself “Nick get it done Knowles.”

But the BBC has strict rules for on-screen stars when participating in on-screen advertising, with one rule prohibiting stars from imitating BBC products.

Under the heading ‘References to BBC content in advertisements’ it reads: ‘Ads or promotions involving talent must not imitate, refer to or suggest a link to or ‘pass on’ BBC content, for example by using editorial elements of a programme. such as characters, logos, titles, station names, or music or graphics associated with the program, or by using or directly imitating sets or key locations, slogans or formatting points from the content.”

It also adds: ‘The BBC is trying not to put undue or unreasonable restrictions on talent, be it on-air talent or other production talent.

However, promotional activities, including commercial advertisements and endorsements, should not risk damaging the integrity of the BBC content with which they are associated, or harming the reputation of the BBC in general.

“Nor should these activities undermine the personal reputation of the individual.

“Promotional work should not suggest support from the BBC, compromise the BBC’s values, discredit the BBC or give the public reason to doubt the impartiality or integrity of BBC on-air talent.”

The BBC has not revealed the bottleneck in Nick’s ad.

Earnings: Shreddies haven't revealed how much Knowles was paid for the ad, but an expert told MailOnline it could be in the region of £200,000

Earnings: Shreddies haven’t revealed how much Knowles was paid for the ad, but an expert told MailOnline it could be in the region of £200,000

Leave a Reply